Category Archives: #NCTEChat

Join #NCTEchat!

nctechatimageHave you joined in on #NCTEchat yet? This Twitter chat takes place on the third Sunday of the month at 8 pm ET. There is a new topic each chat.  If you have never participated in a Twitter Chat, you are in for a tweet!

You have probably heard about Twitter and that Twitter messages are limited to 140 characters or less. Twitter hashtag chats are pre-organized events and use keywords with hashtags (#). The # symbol, called a hashtag, is used to mark keywords in a Tweet and therefore categorizes messages. Hashtags make it easy to see the full conversation on a particular topic: Simply type the keyword into the search box at the top of your Twitter screen. For our Twitter Chat, the hashtag is #NCTEchat.

Wanting to join the Conversation? From the Twitter homepage, either sign in or sign up for a new account. At the time of the chat, type #NCTEchat into the search box at the top of your Twitter homepage. “Listen” in. Watch the comments coming from other attendees. When you are ready, speak up! To compose your own message, click the blue and white icon (looks like a notepad and quill) in the upper right corner of your Twitter page. Be sure to include #NCTEchat somewhere in your post, so that your comment is automatically pulled into the chat feed for others to see.

#NCTEchat uses the Q1/A1 format. When discussion questions are posed, they will be labeled with a Q showing it’s a question. If you are responding to a question, use an A to show that you are answering and you the same number that was in the prompt.

Twitter chats move quickly! If you can’t catch everything as it’s happening, don’t worry! You can search again by #NCTEchat to find the conversations. A Storify will also be posted a day or so after the chat. This is an archive of the conversations that take place in the Twitter chat.

With all this newfound knowledge, we hope to see you at #NCTEchat! The June chat will be held on Sunday, June 25 at 8 pm ET. This month’s topic is “YA Lit: Complex Texts, Complex Lives”.

twitter-chat-graphic-promo-mar-19

Teaching for Responsibility and Independence

Terry Thompson @TerryTreads leads an #NCTEchat on Teaching for Responsibility and IndependenceJoin Terry Thompson @TerryTreads this Sunday for a conversation around “Teaching for Responsibility and Independence.”

Terry is an author, teacher, and consultant living in San Antonio, Texas. He provides staff development for teachers of readers and writers in grades K–8. Currently a reading interventionist, Terry has served as a classroom teacher, basic skills teacher, Reading Recovery teacher, and literacy coach. His most recent book is The Construction Zone: Building Scaffolds for Readers and Writers.

Here’s what we’ll discuss during the chat:

Q1: What challenges do you face when it comes to shifting students toward independence in literacy?

Q2: What evidence do you look for that show students are reaching independence? What assessment practices seem most valuable?

Q3: Despite our best intentions, how might we get in the way of students working at optimal levels of responsibility and how can we monitor for this?

Q4: What are some ways we can invite our students to share the responsibility for learning and to move toward independence?

Q5: How can our feedback help students take responsibility for their own learning?

Q6: After reflecting on tonight’s discussion, how will you be more mindful of teaching for student responsibility and independence tomorrow morning?

#NCTEchat: Teaching Controversial Works of Literature

Hosted by: Jim Brooks, @TeachGoodThings

 

#nctechat: Teaching Controversial Works of Literature Feb. 19 8pm ET

Join us for a lively conversation about the challenging texts we choose to use in the classroom. Here are the questions we’ll discuss:

Q1 How do you select the texts you teach your students?

Q2 When is a text “controversial”?

Q3 What strategies have you found useful for exploring these texts in class?

Q4 How have you seen students benefit from grappling with controversial texts?

Q5 What supports do you find you need to teach such texts well?

Q6 How do you talk with parents / guardians / admin about the texts you use in class?

Q7 What’s one text that you’d like to learn how to teach and why?


Jim Brooks, host of #NCTEchat "Teaching Controversial Works of Literature" Jim Brooks is the language arts department chair at West Wilkes High School in Millers Creek, NC.  Among his many teaching accolades, he was the 2008 recipient of the NCTE Media Literacy Award.

#NCTEchat: Black Girls’ Literacies

There is a fantastic #nctechat coming up this Sunday at 8pm on “Black Girls’ Literacies.” It is inspired by the July issue of English Education that was guest edited by Marcelle Haddix and Yolanda Sealey-Ruiz.

Hosts for the event include authors from that journal article: 
Detra Price-Dennis, @detramichelle
Marcelle Haddix, @MarcelleHaddix
Gholdy Muhammad, and Sherell McArthur @bglcollective
Yolanda Sealey-Ruiz, @RuizSealey

Questions the chat will explore: 

Q1: Why do Black girls’ literacies matter in today’s society?

Q2: How do you cultivate space in your classroom where Black girls’ literacy
practices can thrive?

Q3: What are some useful mentor texts that support Black girls’ literacies?

Q4: What are some useful professional resources for teachers?

Q5: What is one take away from tonight’s chat that will inform your practice?

An image you can help us share: 

#NCTEchat on Black Girls' LIteracies questions: Q1: Why do Black girls’ literacies matter in today’s society? Q2: How do you cultivate space in your classroom where Black girls’ literacy practices can thrive? Q3: What are some useful mentor texts that support Black girls’ literacies? Q4: What are some useful professional resources for teachers? Q5: What is one take away from tonight’s chat that will inform your practice?

Check out previous posts on this topic:

Writing to Make Sense of Who We Are

Black Girls Read: An African American Read-In Celebrating the African American Female Literary Legacies of the Past, Present, and Future

#NCTEchat Preview: Why Writing Workshop?

This post is written by NCTE member Betsy Hubbard. 

#NCTETwitterChatBetsyHubbardintro“Writers do not write with words and conventions alone; writers write above all with meaning.”

~Lucy Calkins, A Guide to the Writing Workshop Grades 3-5

When I began using the writing workshop model in my classroom, I started to truly understand the importance of meaning within writing. I began to appreciate that my students had stories and ideas that were greater than any topic I could assign. As a teacher, I really began to reflect on my practices, noticing that my students had an investment in their own learning when using this framework. Before using this model, my focus was on the product and appearance of the writing. Growing as an educator forced me to find something better as I watched my students’ writing fail to flourish. Are you a teacher using the writing workshop model? Are you a teacher who is thinking about taking a leap and trying it this fall?

Join us, the co-authors of Two Writing Teachers, on Sunday, August 21st as we tackle the topic, “Why Writing Workshop?” Questions will begin at 8:00 p.m. ET using #NCTEchat.

Here is a preview of the questions:

#NCTETwitterChatBetsyHubbard

Betsy loves collaborating with teachers Prek-12 sharing ideas and celebrations of all things related to writing instruction and best practice. As a co-author of Two Writing Teachers, Betsy is able to share this learning with readers across the globe.

Betsy can be found at Two Writing Teachers [http://twowritingteachers.org] and on Twitter @Betsy_writes