Category Archives: #NCTEChat

#NCTEchat: Teaching Controversial Works of Literature

Hosted by: Jim Brooks, @TeachGoodThings

 

#nctechat: Teaching Controversial Works of Literature Feb. 19 8pm ET

Join us for a lively conversation about the challenging texts we choose to use in the classroom. Here are the questions we’ll discuss:

Q1 How do you select the texts you teach your students?

Q2 When is a text “controversial”?

Q3 What strategies have you found useful for exploring these texts in class?

Q4 How have you seen students benefit from grappling with controversial texts?

Q5 What supports do you find you need to teach such texts well?

Q6 How do you talk with parents / guardians / admin about the texts you use in class?

Q7 What’s one text that you’d like to learn how to teach and why?


Jim Brooks, host of #NCTEchat "Teaching Controversial Works of Literature" Jim Brooks is the language arts department chair at West Wilkes High School in Millers Creek, NC.  Among his many teaching accolades, he was the 2008 recipient of the NCTE Media Literacy Award.

#NCTEchat: Black Girls’ Literacies

There is a fantastic #nctechat coming up this Sunday at 8pm on “Black Girls’ Literacies.” It is inspired by the July issue of English Education that was guest edited by Marcelle Haddix and Yolanda Sealey-Ruiz.

Hosts for the event include authors from that journal article: 
Detra Price-Dennis, @detramichelle
Marcelle Haddix, @MarcelleHaddix
Gholdy Muhammad, and Sherell McArthur @bglcollective
Yolanda Sealey-Ruiz, @RuizSealey

Questions the chat will explore: 

Q1: Why do Black girls’ literacies matter in today’s society?

Q2: How do you cultivate space in your classroom where Black girls’ literacy
practices can thrive?

Q3: What are some useful mentor texts that support Black girls’ literacies?

Q4: What are some useful professional resources for teachers?

Q5: What is one take away from tonight’s chat that will inform your practice?

An image you can help us share: 

#NCTEchat on Black Girls' LIteracies questions: Q1: Why do Black girls’ literacies matter in today’s society? Q2: How do you cultivate space in your classroom where Black girls’ literacy practices can thrive? Q3: What are some useful mentor texts that support Black girls’ literacies? Q4: What are some useful professional resources for teachers? Q5: What is one take away from tonight’s chat that will inform your practice?

Check out previous posts on this topic:

Writing to Make Sense of Who We Are

Black Girls Read: An African American Read-In Celebrating the African American Female Literary Legacies of the Past, Present, and Future

#NCTEchat Preview: Why Writing Workshop?

This post is written by NCTE member Betsy Hubbard. 

#NCTETwitterChatBetsyHubbardintro“Writers do not write with words and conventions alone; writers write above all with meaning.”

~Lucy Calkins, A Guide to the Writing Workshop Grades 3-5

When I began using the writing workshop model in my classroom, I started to truly understand the importance of meaning within writing. I began to appreciate that my students had stories and ideas that were greater than any topic I could assign. As a teacher, I really began to reflect on my practices, noticing that my students had an investment in their own learning when using this framework. Before using this model, my focus was on the product and appearance of the writing. Growing as an educator forced me to find something better as I watched my students’ writing fail to flourish. Are you a teacher using the writing workshop model? Are you a teacher who is thinking about taking a leap and trying it this fall?

Join us, the co-authors of Two Writing Teachers, on Sunday, August 21st as we tackle the topic, “Why Writing Workshop?” Questions will begin at 8:00 p.m. ET using #NCTEchat.

Here is a preview of the questions:

#NCTETwitterChatBetsyHubbard

Betsy loves collaborating with teachers Prek-12 sharing ideas and celebrations of all things related to writing instruction and best practice. As a co-author of Two Writing Teachers, Betsy is able to share this learning with readers across the globe.

Betsy can be found at Two Writing Teachers [http://twowritingteachers.org] and on Twitter @Betsy_writes 

June #nctechat preview: Books That Changed My Life

June #nctechat

We hope you’ll join us on Twitter Sunday June 19 at 8 PM ET for #nctechat: Books That Changed My Life.  Read more about the inspiration for the chat from this post earlier in June.

Here is a preview of the questions to guide the chat:

  • Tell us about the book(s) that changed your life.
  • How did you discover that life changing book?
  • Is there a book you can pinpoint that turned you into a reader?
  • Have you ever given someone else a book that changed them?
  • Was there ever a book you assigned as a teacher or read as a student that changed a whole class?
  • What are some life-changing books you’ve heard other people talk about that you haven’t had an opportunity to read yet? (Perhaps a summer reading goal?)

What Books Have Changed Your Life?

June #nctechatLast year during Independent Bookstore Day, a local bookstore in Ann Arbor where I live set up a photo booth and asked patrons to take a picture with a “Book That Changed My Life.” I didn’t actually participate in this photo booth experience because I didn’t know about it until I read the store’s blog post about it afterwards, but even with the ephemeral nature of the Internet and social media, that idea has continued to stick with me all these months later. What books have changed my life? My colleagues’ lives? And more importantly, my students’ lives?

When I was tasked with the job of planning this month’s #nctechat to revolve around summer reading, I thought about how we could use this as an opportunity to remind educational stakeholders that reading can be more than just for learning and for leisure. The right book in the right hands at the right time can be a life-transforming experience.

But so often students are presented summer reading as a job. An assignment. A way to extend the school year and turn it into yet another dreaded task to carry out with as little joy as possible. And in our effort to prevent the “summer slide” we lose sight of those other reasons for which we read: not just to learn, but to find joy and be transformed.

On Sunday June 19 at 8 PM ET, we invite you to join our #nctechat on Twitter to discuss all those life-changing books and writers in your life. But let’s also extend this conversation to the people who matter the most: our students. Invite any and all stakeholders to be a part of the discussion: students, parents, colleagues, and even the authors of the life-changing books themselves. By the end of this month’s chat, we hope you will be reminded not just of those books that changed your life, but how you can help your students find their own path to life-changing reading experiences.

Questions for the chat:

  1. Let’s begin by introducing ourselves. Are you here to share your love of reading as a teacher, student, parent, author?
  2. Let’s get to what we’re here for: Tell us about the book(s) that changed your life.
  3. How did you discover that life changing book?
  4. Is there a book you can pinpoint that turned you into a reader?
  5. Have you ever given someone else a book that changed them?
  6. Was there ever a book you assigned as a teacher or read as a student that changed a whole class?
  7. What are some life-changing books you’ve heard other people talk about that you haven’t had an opportunity to read yet? (Perhaps a summer reading goal?)