Tag Archives: activity

Take Me Out to the Ballgame!

sportsThis week in the United States, Major League Baseball holds their All-Star game. Harness students’ interest in sports and incorporate them into the classroom!

Developing Contemporary Literacies through Sports: A Guide for the English Classroom shares meaningful and productive ways to engage students in reading, writing, and other literacy practices. It’s a collection of lessons and commentaries–from established teachers, teacher educators, scholars, and authors–and its companion website provide numerous resources that support teachers in developing students’ contemporary literacies through sports.

Tune in to this podcast episode to hear about works of sports fiction and nonfiction that explore issues of identity and belonging, courage and equal rights, and changes over time in American history and culture.

We’ve all heard the expression “poetry in motion”. This activity gets children writing poems about grace and movement using photos of athletes.

In “Swish! Pow! Whack! Teaching Onomatopoeia Through Sports Poetry” students explore poetry about sports, looking closely at the use of onomatopoeia. After viewing a segment of a sporting event, students create their own onomatopoeic sports poems.

Through the retelling of the 1941 baseball season, children will see two legendary players as characters in “Batter Up! Telling Sports Stories With Trading Cards” and can create trading cards that highlight these players.

Invite students to look at different online baseball trivia questions to see how they are written. Then, as part of this activity, have children write their own questions and play a trivia game.

How do you incorporate sports into the literacy classroom?

Spending Time with Family

its-my-familyThe holiday season is here, which usually means spending time with family. Listen in to this podcast episode as host Emily Manning discusses some heartwarming books about families. If you are spending time with family over winter break, in person or virtually, work together on these activities:

Create a Game: Playing board games or card games can be a fun activity, so why not make your own?

Play Bingo! Work together, create a bingo board that can be played while walking around town, going to the zoo or a museum, or traveling on a vacation.

Write Letters to Friends and FamilyInvite young adults to write letters to classmates, postcards from travels, and e-mails to family and friends.

Recording Family Stories: Teens can take part in the process of building family histories by recording the stories, or memoirs, of family members.

Creating Family TimelinesChildren can interview family members and make an illustrated timeline of the most important family events and memories.

See you in 2017!