Tag Archives: CCC Journal

A New CCC to Kickstart the New School Year

This post is written by member Jens Lloyd, editorial assistant for College Composition and Communication.

 College Composition and Communication publishes scholarship in rhetoric and composition studies that supports college teachers in reflecting on and improving their practices in teaching writing. Our September 2017 issue, available online and in print, launches volume 69 of the journal. We hope its contents provide you with inspiration for the new school year!

Heather Bastian opens the issue by sharing her research into how students respond to unconventional assignments. Bastian’s article, which is free online even to nonmembers, provides some clear-sighted strategies for accommodating students’ affective responses to assignments that, for one reason or another, don’t conform to their expectations for academic writing. Next, Laurie Grobman reflects on a racially charged controversy that she confronted while supervising a community writing partnership that involved undergraduates conducting archival research. In the face of enduring questions about systemic racism, Grobman’s thoughtful and complicated account of how she responded to the controversy will prove beneficial to teacher-scholars facing similar dilemmas in classrooms, community settings, and elsewhere in their professional lives.

Articles by David M. Grant and Steven Fraiberg probe the boundaries of what we (don’t) know about writing and rhetoric. Displaying tremendous dexterity in moving between indigenous rhetorics and contemporary scholarship on new materialisms, Grant challenges us to more fully and more fundamentally account for nonhumans in our day-to-day communicative interactions. Fraiberg’s article, based on a long-term case study of DaVe, an individual whom Fraiberg began interviewing in the late 2000s, pieces together a constellation of artifacts drawn largely from DaVe’s time in the Israeli military to offer a portrait of how complex transmedia and translingual literacy practices unfold across various modes and genres.

Jim Webber considers recent debates about educational reform, focusing specifically on how literacy professionals respond by invoking the philosophical tradition of pragmatism. Ultimately, in the hopes of expanding rather than shutting down public deliberation about these regimes of reform, Webber advances a version of pragmatism that he dubs, via Dewey, artful critique.

To conclude this issue, Karen Rowan reviews three books about rhetorical education in diverse settings, and 2016 CCCC Exemplar Award winner Sondra Perl reflects on her illustrious career.

We are thrilled that all September authors are featured in our podcast series. Check out these interviews for additional insights into the scholarship published in CCC. We welcome feedback and questions about the journal (and our podcasts series!) at ccceditors@gmail.com.

Jens Lloyd is a PhD candidate at UC Irvine.

The Latest Issue of College Composition and Communication

This post is written by member Jens Lloyd, editorial assistant for College Composition and Communication.

cccdec2016cover College Composition and Communication (CCC) publishes scholarship in rhetoric and composition studies that supports college teachers in reflecting on and improving their practices in teaching writing. CCC aims to promote the most current scholarship in the field, scholarship that draws on research and theories from a broad range of humanistic disciplines and from within the many subfields of rhetoric and composition. Our December 2016 issue, available online and in print, demonstrates this breadth of scholarly inquiry.

Those interested in the intellectual trends that have shaped the teaching of writing will want to read Chris W. Gallagher’s article on the legacy of behaviorism in writing studies. As Gallagher argues, though behaviorism is often treated as a dirty word from a bygone era, the behaviors of student writers remain central to the ways in which writing instruction is conceptualized and promoted in contemporary disciplinary conversations. Gallagher muses about the insights we can cultivate from this neglected aspect of our disciplinary history.

Teachers looking for insights that they can apply in their own classrooms should consider the articles by Jennifer Lin LeMesurier, who shares findings from ethnographic research on genre uptake and embodiment, and Jeffrey A. Bacha, who details an assignment sequence that utilizes the campus-built environment to get students thinking about rhetorical invention and usability studies. Also, extending the recent translingual turn in rhetoric and composition, Jerry Won Lee and Christopher Jenks detail a global partnership they coordinated between their two courses. Lee and Jenks suggest that a pedagogy aimed at cultivating translingual dispositions can be beneficial for monolingual and multilingual students alike.

Finally, teachers, administrators, and others committed to supporting the many types of students that enroll at our institutions will want to read D. Alexis Hart and Roger Thompson’s article on student veterans. Based on an extensive, multi-campus research project which received funding support from CCCC, Hart and Thompson offer a wide-ranging glimpse at how colleges are responding to expanding military student enrollments. Beyond any particular pedagogical or administrative recommendations, Hart and Thompson are most interested in encouraging proactive discussions at every institution about how best to support student veterans. Hart and Thompson’s article provides an excellent starting place for these conversations and for readers wanting to learn more about this burgeoning area of teaching and research.

Some of our December authors are featured in our podcast series. Check out these interviews for additional insights into the scholarship we publish in CCC.

We welcome feedback and questions about the journal at ccceditors@gmail.com.

Jens Lloyd is a PhD candidate at UC Irvine.

Getting to Know Your Journal: A Quick Hello from College Composition and Communication

The following post is by NCTE member Jonathan Alexander and editor of College Composition and Communication.

cccsep2016coverWhile many of you are likely already familiar with College Composition and Communication, you may be less familiar with the journal’s objectives and the sort of work that we publish. CCC prides itself on collecting and amplifying voices from across the field: from two-year and four-year colleges and universities, from writing studies outside of the traditional university, and from quantitative and qualitative studies. Our journal focuses on publishing research and scholarship in composition studies that supports college teachers as they reflect on and improve their practices in teaching writing. Because composition studies often draws from a broad range of humanistic disciplines, our pages reflect the great diversity of work that contributes to that project. We regularly publish work related to technical communication, computers and writing, writing across the curriculum, research practices, the history of composition, assessment, the politics of writing and of teaching writing, and writing center work.

By publishing in CCC, scholars are able to reach a diverse readership that includes teachers of college-level writing at various types of institutions and literacy centers, administrators, undergraduate and graduate students, legislators, corporate employers, parents of college-aged children, and undergraduate and graduate alumni. As you can imagine, the articles we publish are therefore unique in their accessibility; though complex and sophisticated, scholarship printed in CCC shows great rhetorical flexibility in considering the interests and perspectives of this wide range of readers. The articles and review essays which appear in CCC undergo a rigorous and anonymous peer review process, ensuring that the work that we publish—approximately 15 percent of the submissions we receive—are of the highest quality and of the highest interest to our readers.

If you would like to learn more about subscribing to or submitting to CCC, I encourage you to check out our Web presence at www.ncte.org/cccc/ccc. You can also email me directly at ccceditors@gmail.com.

jalexanderJonathan Alexander is Chancellor’s Professor of English at the University of California, Irvine, where he is also the Director of the Center for Excellence in Writing & Communication.  He is the editor of College Composition and Communication.