Tag Archives: Education Funding

2017-april-policy-analyst-blog

What Happened in Your State This April?

This past month, ten policy analysts published reports about what occurred in the following states: Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Louisiana, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

ESSA Implementation

Colorado: Stevi Quate discusses Colorado’s choice of attendance as the fifth indicator in ESSA Colorado-Style: The Challenge of the Fifth Indicator.

Readers may want to visit ESSA Implementation in the States to see what your state is doing.

Higher Education

Texas: In Campus Carry VII, Michael Gos continues his series, noting that this August, students may carry a concealed weapon at community colleges. There is concern, however, over the presence of high school students who attend classes through dual enrollment.

Funding and Budget

California: Dan Melzer shares Assembly Democratic Leaders Announce “Degrees Not Debt” Higher Education Budget Package, in which the Degrees Not Debt Scholarship will provide a supplemental grant to full-time students receiving certain grants.

Connecticut: Stephen Ferruci addresses Debt Forgiveness in Connecticut given that Connecticut ranks third in student debt.

New York: According to Derek Kulnis, New York State Offers Free College Tuition through the Excelsior Scholarship to any New Yorker, within certain income limits, accepted to a community college or four-year public university

Pennsylvania: Due to declining budgets and enrollments, Possible Faculty Lay-Offs and Program Cuts are on the horizon, D. Alexis Hart writes.

PreK–12

Arkansas: In Little Rock School District at Status Quo, Donna Wake expresses the concern that the state is closing schools in predominantly African American neighborhoods after having passed a law offering charter schools the rights of first refusal for unused school facilities.

Donna also provides links for teachers to review Annual School Performance and an analysis of Teacher and Superintendent Salaries.

Louisiana: Jalissa Bates explains in Louisiana High School Students and Businesses Benefit from “Jump Start Summers” that grants from businesses support student efforts to attend school in the summer.

New York: Derek Kulnis posts that New York Changes Parent-Teacher Conferences by including students in the conferences to review their work and to provide time for teachers to have parental interaction.

Wisconsin: Kris Cody-Johnson shares state education information in Lifetime Licenses for Teachers Potentially Returns for Wisconsin, Wisconsin Requests Budget for Mental Health, and Voices Grow to Repeal Wisconsin School Start Date.

Wyoming: Tiffany Rehbein shares that Wyoming Districts Look to Sue State Over Funding.

2017-march-policy-analyst-blog

What Happened in Your State This March?

This past month, thirty policy analysts published reports about what occurred in the following states: Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Idaho, Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, and Wisconsin.

ESSA Implementation

Colorado: Stevi Quate shared Colorado Teachers Invited to Shape Policy.

Ohio: Robin Holland wrote Ohio’s ESSA Plan—Submission Delayed in Response to Public Feedback.

Vermont: Susanmarie Harrington shared Vermont Responds to the Every Child Succeeds Act (ESSA).

Readers may want to visit ESSA Implementation in the States to see what your state is doing.

Higher Education

Massachusetts: Mya Poe shares UMass President Criticizes Federal Travel Ban in First State of the University Address.

Missouri: Jane Greer describes Missouri’s push to graduate college students on time in 15 to Finish in Missouri.

North Carolina: In NC College Students Have More Options, Terry McLean writes about dual enrollment, Reverse Transfer Options, High Achieving Tuition Scholarships, and NC Promise.

Ohio: Michelle Rankins describes recently passed legislation in Ohio Concealed Carry Law and College Campuses.

Tennessee: Melanie Hundley analyzes Tennessee and the edTPA.

Texas: In Texas Immigration Bill, Michael Gos describes the impact of the anti-sanctuary bill passed by the Texas Senate on state and local governments and campuses.

Funding and Budget

Connecticut: Stephen Ferruci discusses What Happens to Low-Income Students in CT?

Massachusetts: Mya Poe shares that Massachusetts college students ask for more funding and free tuition for a year.

Mississippi: Kerri Jordan describes the Funding Shortfalls in Mississippi.

Montana: Karen Henderson notes the possible closing of college campuses in Funding Proposals 2017 Legislature.

Nebraska: Deborah Minter writes Budget Shortfall Threatens Public College, Community College and University Budgets.

Oregon: In her Focus on Oregon: Budget and Free Community College, Cornelia Paraskevas describes Oregon’s budget shortfall and the ramifications of Oregon Promise assisting wealthier families more than those with lower incomes.

Pennsylvania: Due to declining budgets and enrollments, D. Alexis Hart writes about the Possible Reorganization of Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE).

Rhode Island: Michael Geary describes Rhode Island’s Promise: Free Tuition.

Utah: SLCC Promise Offers “Free” Community College, according to Christie Toth.

Wisconsin: Donna Pasternak writes Governor Walker Proposes Closer Monitoring of Faculty Workloads While Allowing Students to Opt Out of Fees in 2017–2019 Budget Proposal That Will Increase Funding at WI IHEs.

PreK–12

Arkansas: Donna Wake delineates various Legislative Actions in Arkansas, including a ban of Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States, options for education savings accounts, expansion of charter schools, and a requirement that all K-6 and special education licensure candidates take a stand-alone test in skills related to the “science of reading.”

Idaho: In Change Is in the Air, Darlene Dyer describes the legislature’s funding proposals.

Kentucky: Emily Zuccaro analyzes KY HB 250: Charter Schools.

Maine: Susan Stires reports Rural Public Schools See Choice as a Detriment to Their Communities.

Massachusetts: Mya Poe filed a number of reports: Board of Elementary and Secondary Education Approves Three New Charter Schools, Massachusetts’ Four-Year Graduation Rate Improves for 10th Consecutive Year, Massachusetts Leads Nation in Advanced Placement Success, Massachusetts FY2018 Budget Released, and Massachusetts Introduces Public Website to Search Teacher and Administrator Licensure.

Minnesota: Ezra Hyland writes about the Minnesota Senate E-12 Education Budget.

New York: Derek Kulnis posted about Renewal Schools and the Community Schools Model, New York State Eliminates ALST Test, and the increase in New York Graduation Rates.

Pennsylvania: Aileen Hower shares Wolf Administration Reacts to Proposed Cuts, Calls on US Secretary of Education to Support Investments in Public Education.

Vermont: Susanmarie Harrington suggests NCTE members in Vermont might find the Agency of Education’s weekly field memo a useful resource.

Virginia: Mabel Khawaja files A Brief Report on Charter Schools in Virginia.

Wisconsin: Donna Pasternak discusses the implications for English language arts and NCTE in State of Wisconsin Proposing New Teacher Licensure Regulations to Curtail Teacher Shortage. [Readers may want to read Peg Grafwallner’s reponse to Donna’s report titled “Of Teacher Shortages and Licensure Regulations,” posted April 14 on Literacy & NCTE.]

PreK–12 and Higher Education

Delaware: In Remediating the Need for Remediation, Christine Cucciarre describes a pilot course, Foundations of College English, to prepare high school students for college-level writing and avoid the need for remediation.

Florida: In Developmental Education and 2016/17 State Bills, Alison Reynolds provides a snapshot of various policies and legislation, including a policy that allows students to opt out of developmental courses, a focus on four-year graduation from college, a pilot program for competency-based education, and expansion of school choice.

Oklahoma: Michele Eodice and Anastasia Wickham delineate a number of aspects of the Oklahoma Budget Crisis.

South Carolina: In Reading, Writing, and Roadwork in South Carolina, Matthew Nelson shares that the South Carolina House of Representatives would divert funds from education to roads.

Federal

Minnesota: Ezra Hyland listed education cuts in FY 18 Federal Budget. In U.S. Supreme Court Rules in 2 Special Education Cases, Ezra noted the Supreme Court’s ruling that IDEA law requires that the term “educational benefit” of a special education IEP means more than minimal progress, and the remanding back to the district court of a case involving a student with severe cerebral palsy bringing her service dog to class.

What Happened in Your State This November?

capitol buildingThis past month, eight policy analysts published reports about what occurred in the District of Columbia, Idaho, Louisiana, Minnesota, Ohio, Vermont, Virginia, and Wisconsin.

Robin Holland shared that Ohio Expands Preschools and Early Education by voting to allocate funds.

According to Kris Cody-Johnson, WI Superintendent Evers Examines School Funding Distribution in order to make funding between schools more equitable.

In Updates on Act 46: An Act related to making amendments to education funding, education spending, and education governance, Anne Slonaker describes how towns in Vermont are merging into larger districts, impacting funding and school choice.

Kris Cody-Johnson cites the impact of school choice and vouchers on public schools in School Vouchers Grow in Wisconsin.

Janique Parrott reported in Mayor Bowser Nominates New Chancellor  that Antwan Wilson will be the next chancellor of DC public schools, noting Mr. Wilson’s support for charter schools and test-based accountability for teachers and students.

Darlene Dyer explored the Go-On Issues for Idaho, touching on Idaho’s push for 60 percent of Idaho’s citizens between 25 and 34 to earn a degree or certificate by 2020 and the reasons why they are struggling to achieve that percentage.

Ezra Hyland lists Grants for Minnesota Teachers from preschool through college. He also describes the Minnesota Charter School Segregation Challenge.

Clancy Ratliff shares Louisiana’s Standards for Students with Cognitive Disabilities and English Language Learners, also called the “Louisiana Connectors.”

In Welcome, Virginia Educators, Leila Christenbury lists a number of resources for Virginia educators. She also notes that the Proposed Notification of “Sexually Explicit” Texts Resurges as Virginia Board of Education Considers Revised Regulations.

Kris Cody-Johnson writes that a Wisconsin Bill Would Allow Licensed Guns at Private Schools.

What Happened in Your State this August?

capitol buildingThis past month, ten policy analysts published reports about what occurred in the following states: Arkansas, California, Connecticut, New Mexico, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin. Reports were evenly divided between K–12 and higher education.

Higher Education

Erin O’Neill describes New Mexico’s General Education Revision Initiative and Michael Gos the Core Curriculum (General Education) Requirements in Texas. In New Mexico, “five areas of essential skills were identified: Communication, Critical Thinking, Personal and Social Responsibility, Quantitative Skills, and Information Literacy.” In 2014 the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board “put into effect a new 42 semester credit hour core curriculum for all undergraduate students.”

Dan Melzer cites a research report from the Center for Studies in Higher Education at the University of California, Berkeley, recommending that UC Berkeley “eliminate the SAT as a factor in admissions decisions.” The report found that the disparate impact on students of color outweighed indications of success. In Study Finds Access to Technology May Lower Student Performance, Washington’s Amanda Espinosa-Aguilar suggests students taking notes longhand “retain their knowledge longer than those who do not.”

Stephen Ferruci highlights that while funding for corrections in Connecticut increased, the funding for higher education decreased.

K–12 Education

New Jersey and Pennsylvania have chosen opposite approaches to graduation requirements. Whereas NJ Adopts PARCC as Graduation Requirement (Kristen Turner) for Algebra I and language arts courses, Pennsylvania is exploring alternative assessments: Pennsylvania Governor Looking to Move Graduation Requirements Away from Standardized Tests (Aileen Hower).

Donna Wake reports on the New Arkansas Literacy Standards and how in 16 districts, Arkansas approved Waivers on Teacher Licensure similar to those granted in charter schools. Arkansas is one of a number of states allowing school districts to hire non-licensed teachers.

In ECOT, Charter Schools, and Voucher Programs in Ohio, Robin Holland reports on a study that found that “higher performing students opting to use vouchers to attend private schools performed significantly worse on state exams that lower performing students who, though eligible for vouchers, remained in public school.” Robin does note that the report merits further evaluation. She also describes the controversy surrounding ECOT (Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow) related to the discrepancies between student attendance and the funds requested by ECOT from the Ohio Department of Education.

Kris Cody-Johnson describes the committee formed in Wisconsin to Study Data Protection. That committee will study how student data are collected and safeguarded.

What Happened In Your State This July?

This is the next in a monthly series to inform members about what is going on in your state.

capitol buildingThis past month, ten policy analysts published reports about what occurred in the following states: California, Connecticut, Kentucky, Louisiana, New Hampshire, Ohio, Oklahoma, Texas, Vermont and Wisconsin. The reports range from prekindergarten through higher education.

Anne Slonaker reports on Act 166: An act relating to providing access to publicly funded prekindergarten in Vermont for all children ages 3 and 4 for two years.

Kris Cody-Johnson reported on a number of issues in Wisconsin. In Milwaukee Schools Face Tumult,  she describes the conflict between legislators who wish to convert traditional public schools to charters and the families of color who wish to retain some local control. SAGE Program Ends describes the Wisconsin legislature eliminating a successful program for low-income students in kindergarten through third grade and replacing it with instructional coaching for teachers and one-on-one tutoring for students.

The transfer of public monies to private schools was illustrated in the following posts: Wisconsin Special Needs Voucher Law in which SB 615 permitted children with disabilities to attend private schools with a $12,000 voucher and Wisconsin Voucher Expansion. In the latter post, Kris Cody-Johnson described the implications of private schools receiving public funding without the same requirements imposed on public schools. She wrote that a Christian school receiving public funding required “parents to provide a birth certificate to know the child’s born gender and sign a parent handbook listing what a student can be disciplined and expelled for, including homosexuality.” Senator Johnson Works to Stop DOJ Investigations Protecting Title II outlines the efforts of United States Senator Ron Johnson (R-WI) introducing an amendment that would bar the Department of Justice from enforcing the Americans with Disabilities Act for private schools receiving public funding.

In May of this year, the Wisconsin Supreme Court ruled that the Wisconsin State Superintendent Remains Independent against the wishes of Governor Scott Walker, who interpreted Act 21 as giving him final say on administrative rules related to public education.

Like many other states, Wisconsin sees increased teacher shortage.

Kentucky’s Emily Zuccaro reports on the findings of a report released from the Migration Policy Institute in Improving Education for Migrant-Background Students.  Stephen Ferrucci describes A Good Place for Higher Education DREAMers at Eastern Connecticut State University where 49 immigrant students will receive scholarships from a non-profit to attend.

Dan Melzer’s report on California’s Final State Budget for 2016-17 focused on higher education, particularly, grants for college readiness and improving graduation rates. In The University System of New Hampshire Expands its Open Education Initiative to Reduce Costs for Students, He also posted about Eloy Ortiz Oakley Named Chancellor of the California Community College System, the first Latino chancellor of the California community college system. Alexandria Peary describes New Hampshire’s provision of open educational resources, pedagogy and access for college students.

Robin Holland describes Ohio’s College Credit Plus Program that allows students, grades 7-12 to earn college credit at no cost while simultaneously earning high school credit for the same course. She notes an online survey for Ohio’s Learning Standards Revision due August 1.

Jalissa Bates publicizes that the Louisiana State Superintendent Hosts Statewide Forums to Address Every Student Succeeds Act.

[Note: ESSA Implementation in the States lists forums, surveys and contact information all over the United States.]

In Campus Carry Law V, Michael Gos reports on the conceal carry law enacted in Texas that will go into effect August 1.

Anastasia Wickham describes how 40 of 78 Oklahoma educators, parents and/or advocates won primaries and will be running for election this November in Educators/advocates win primaries.