Tag Archives: NDW

October 2017 #NCTEchat: The National Day on Writing

Join us tomorrow, Sunday, October 15, at 8 p.m. ET, on Twitter for an #NCTEchat all about the National Day on Writing®.

The National Day on Writing (October 20) was founded by our members on the premise that writing is critical to literacy but needs greater attention and celebration. Since 2008, we’ve watched thousands of people celebrate writing on October 20 through photos, events, and, of course, the written word, using #WhyIWrite. Join the #NCTEchat on Sunday to connect with other educators and get new ideas and inspiration for ways to celebrate the National Day on Writing on Friday!

Here are the questions for tomorrow’s Twitter chat:

1. Why do you write?

2. What is your go-to mentor text? How do you use it?

3. What is your go-to resource for teaching writing? Why is it important to you?

4. How will you celebrate the National Day on Writing?

5. What is one goal you have for writing/teaching writing?

We hope to see you there! Be sure to join us by using #NCTEchat and #WhyIWrite.

Celebrate Writing All Month Long!

In light of the significance of writing in our national life, to draw attention to the remarkable variety of writing we engage in, and to help writers from all walks of life recognize how important writing is to their lives, NCTE established October 20 as the National Day on Writing. For the ninth year in a row, October 20 will be a day devoted to the importance of writing in our lives. To gear up to celebrate the National Day on Writing, NCTE plans to share resources on writing the entire month of October! Here are some ideas for you to celebrate writing all month long:

  • Encourage your students to uncover all of the different kinds of writing they do on a daily basis by asking them to keep a list of everything they write, from text messages to school assignments, e-mails to diary entries, in a single day.
  • After students make a list of everything they wrote in a day, help them see the variety in their writing, both individually and as a class. Post colorful chart paper with age-appropriate questions about purpose, audience, genre or type, and technology around the room.
  • Ask students to brainstorm different categories for each poster based on the writing they did. Write these categories on the posters and then have students contribute examples from their personal lists. Facilitate a gallery walk of the posters once students have contributed to all of them.
  • Encourage students to view and reflect on all kinds of writing – no matter the purpose, audience, type, or technology.

As you celebrate writing in October, share out with others using the hashtag #WhyIWrite!

Get Ready for the National Day on Writing!

NDW4RWT2Americans write every day, every week, all year long, in many different forms and for many different purposes.  To draw attention to the richness and variety of our writing experiences, the National Council of Teachers of English has established October 20 as the National Day on Writing. This is a perfect time to host a celebration of writing! The following resources from ReadWriteThink.org provide suggestions for writing celebrations.

A Bear of a Poem: Composing and Performing Found Poetry asks students to revisit familiar childhood stories. They then work together to create a poem that is “found” in the language presented in the picture books they read. Children will look in texts for writing that inspires them—looking for favorite words, phrases, and sentences. Working together, students will combine their words and phrases to create a class poem. When complete, the new written piece can be shared as performance poetry.

Children love to receive mail. Can you imagine their excitement if they received a picture postcard at school? That’s what happens in Mail Time! An Integrated Postcard and Geography Study. Children will write and receive postcards from friends and family, and then chart where all those postcards come from on their classroom map. The most fun of this project is reading and sharing the written postcards that are received.

What Am I? Teaching Poetry through Riddles invites students to investigate riddle poems and the language used in them. They discover that riddle attempts to use language in such a way as to present common things as unfamiliar and then asks its readers/listeners to guess what it is. Students write their own riddles that they can share with their peers or in a class sharing session.

In Rummaging for Fiction: Using Found Photographs and Notes to Spark Story Ideas, students use found notes and photographs as prompts to help them identify subjects, settings, characters, and conflicts for pieces of creative writing. They can then display the notes and images along with their writing and host a Gallery Walk to share their pieces with others.

The Children’s Picture Book Project begins with students evaluating published children’s picture storybooks. Students then plan, write, illustrate, and publish their own children’s picture books. These books can then be shared with reading buddies, siblings, or as part of a writing celebration.

For more celebration ideas, see NCTE’s Ideas for Celebrating the National Day on Writing.

National Day on Writing

NDWIn light of the significance of writing in our national life, to draw attention to the remarkable variety of writing we engage in, and to help writers from all walks of life recognize how important writing is to their lives, NCTE established October 20 as the National Day on Writing.

NCTE established the event in 2009 to celebrate composition in all its forms by individuals from all walks of life. In past years, the Senate has passed resolutions declaring October 20 the National Day on Writing. This year The Teaching Channel, The New York Times Learning Network, and the National Writing Project join NCTE as sponsors.

The National Day on Writing

  • points to the importance of writing instruction and practice at every grade level, for every student and in every subject area from preschool through university,
  • emphasizes the lifelong process of learning to write and composing for different audiences, purposes, and occasions, and
  • encourages Americans to write and enjoy and learn from the writing of others.

People in every walk of life, in every kind of work, and at every age write more than ever before for personal, professional, and civic purposes.

  • They write through text messages and IMs, they use video cameras, cell phones, mobile devices, and, yes, even traditional pen and paper.
  • The social nature of writing invites people in every walk of life, in every kind of work, and at every age to make meaning through composing.

We invite you to be part of the National Day on Writing! Join us on Twitter Sunday, October 18, at 8 p.m. ET for our next #nctechat, “#WhyIWrite: Exploring Writing Habits of Mind.” This event will kick off our seventh annual National Day on Writing celebration.

Follow the Conversation on this #WhyIWrite Tagboard!