Tag Archives: poem

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World Poetry Day

World Poetry Day is recognized every year on March 21. This is the day in which UNESCO recognises the moving spirit of poetry and its transformative effect on culture. To honor World Poetry Day, take some time to read and explore writers from around the globe and bring their works into the classroom.

Durante degli Alighieri, simply called Dante, was a major Italian poet of the Late Middle Ages. His Divine Comedy is widely considered the greatest literary work composed in the Italian language and a masterpiece of world literature. “The Art of Imitation” invites students to craft verse-narratives that mimic the character, plot, and stylistic devices of Dante, as well as Chaucer.

Alastair Reid was a Scottish poet and a scholar of South American literature. Author Naorni Shihab Nye, in “Globos = Balloons“, shares the power of translating poems using a piece from Reid.

India’s Rabindranath Tagore authored a timeless poem, “The man had no useful
work.” “Classic Connections: Aiding Literary Comprehension through Varied Liberal Arts Alliances” explores using that poem as the inspiration for dramatic interpretation.

Rose Macaulay was an English novelist and writer. “Mimesis: Grammar and the Echoing Voice” uses an example by Rose Macaulay to show how she selected her words, as all the adjectives work hard in her description.

Henrik Ibsen was a Norwegian playwright, theatre director, and poet. This article from English Journal used a work from Ibsen to investigate students’ attitudes about
gender.

Elizabeth Barrett Browning was one of the most prominent English poets of the Victorian era, popular in Britain and the United States during her lifetime. This lesson plan from ReadWriteThink.org invites students into “Finding Poetry in Prose: Reading and Writing Love Poems“.

What are your plans for celebrating World Poetry Day?

National Poetry Month: Performing Poetry

Perform a Poem
Perform a Poem

As National Poetry Month winds down, consider inviting students to perform some of the poetry they have read and written throughout the month. Performing poetry allows students to read with expression, using their voice and gestures to convey the meaning of the text. With repeated readings of a poem, younger students become fluent readers and increase their comprehension. Older students analyze and develop their own interpretation of a poem’s meaning and representation through performance.  Take a look at the following resources from NCTE and ReadWriteThink.org.

Performing poetry incorporates oral reading, literature, and the performing arts. This strategy can benefit content area readers, English language learners, or learners with special needs. Read more in this Strategy Guide.

In this lesson, students watch an example of poetry performed orally and then discuss elements of the performance that lead to reading fluency. Students then select a poem to perform in class. A performance critique sheet is used to evaluate performances and can be used for self-evaluation, peer evaluation, and teacher evaluation.

By being present and mindful on nature walks, students write haiku using vivid sensory language; and explore body movement, music and art as visual and kinesthetic representations of their poetry in the lesson plan “Experiencing Haiku Through Mindfulness, Movement & Music“.

Crossing Boundaries Through Bilingual, Spoken-Word Poetry” has students explore the idea of “crossing boundaries” through bilingual, spoken-word poetry, culminating in a poetry slam at school or in the community.

In this lesson plan, using their voices as interpretive instruments, students gain a deeper appreciation of the art of poetry as they prepare a recitation of the frequently anthologized poem “Those Winter Sundays”.

Wordplaygrounds: Reading, Writing, and Performing Poetry in the English Classroom shows how students can move beyond the traditional boundaries of English curricula, interpreting poetry through a variety of media, including music, art, and dance—without special talent and training in these areas.

How do your students perform poetry?

National Poetry Month: Writing Poetry

rebusHelp students recognize the elements of a poem and explore different ways of writing poetry, and you’ll also enable the students to become more familiar with the meaning of words and sentences, sentence structure, rhymes, and vocabulary. Plus, in writing poetry, students will discover a new, limitless world of expression that’s just as fun to share with others as it is to create. Try out some of these lesson plans and resources from ReadWriteThink.org.

Encourage creativity and word play by helping a child recognize the elements of a poem and explore different ways of writing one in this Tip & How To written for families.

Writing Poetry with Rebus and Rhyme” encourages students to use rhyming words to write rebus poetry modeled on rebus books, which substitute pictures for the words that young students cannot yet identify or decode.

Students create poetry collections with the theme of “getting to know each other” in this ReadWriteThink.org lesson plan. They study and then write a variety of forms of poetry to include in their collections.

After reading a book or magazine, children and teens can choose a section and transform it into what’s known as a “found poem” in “Finding Poetry in Pleasure Reading“.

In “The ABCs of Poetry” students examine a letter of the alphabet from all angles, creating image pools of original metaphors that they then turn into poems.

Using an online tool, students summarize papers they have written using the traditional format of a haiku in “Summarizing with Haikus“.

What poetry writing activities do your students enjoy?

you need to read poetry logo

National Poetry Month: Reading Poetry

“What the poem is about and how it explores that material is more important than the technical means it uses. Yet by focusing on those means, we can perhaps get closer to finding out why we felt what we felt. That process can deepen our reading, enhance it, complicate it.”

This quote from Accent on Meter: A Handbook for Readers of Poetry provides a great rationale for reading poetry. The following resources from ReadWriteThink.org provide opportunities for students to read and appreciate poetry.

Looking for poetry suggestions? Listen to the Grades K – 5 Podcast Episode “Playful Poetry Books to Share“. In this episode, host Emily Manning and guest Sylvia Vardell explore fun ways to read poetry with children. Older students can tune in to “Celebrating Poetry for Teens“. In honor of National Poetry Month in April, host Jennifer Buehler shares her recommendations of a variety of poetry books for teens.

Use the lesson plan “Poetry Portfolios: Using Poetry to Teach Reading” to teach your students about sentence structure, rhyming words, sight words, vocabulary, and print concepts using a weekly poem.

Students read various poems and explore why lines are broken where they are and how they affect rhythm, sound, meaning, and appearance in poetry in “What Makes Poetry? Exploring Line Breaks“.

Explore reading strategies using Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven” and other works. In this lesson plan, students read Poe’s works in both large- and small-group readings then conclude with a variety of projects.

Developing Aesthetic Criteria: Using Music to Move Beyond Like/Dislike with Poetry” assists students in developing the cognitive tool of criteria development for discussing the aesthetics of poetry and music.

Ease students’ fear of interpreting complex poetry by teaching them a strategy with which they determine patterns of imagery, diction, and figurative language in order to unlock meaning with the lesson plan “Thinking Inductively: A Close Reading of Seamus Heaney’s ‘Blackberry Picking’“.

How do you engage students in reading poetry?

Online Tools and Apps for Poetry

toolsApril is National Poetry Month! ReadWriteThink.org! As you’re planning poetry activities during this month (and beyond!) consider using these poetry-focused ReadWriteThink.org interactive tools and mobile apps.

The Acrostic Poems tool helps students learn about and write acrostic poems, a poetry form that uses the letters in a word to begin each line of the poem. All lines of the poem relate to or describe the main topic word. Also available as a Mobile App. In this lesson plan,  students create acrostic poems using their names and the names of things that are important to them.

In the Diamante Poems tool or Mobile App, users can learn about and write diamante poems, which are diamond-shaped poems that use nouns, adjectives, and gerunds to describe either one central topic or two opposing topics (for example, night/day or winter/spring). Writing, revising, and publishing are just a few of the tasks students will complete in this lesson plan in order to take their cause-and-effect diamante poems from an idea to a reality.

Students can learn about and write haiku using this interactive tool that guides them through the writing process. There is a corresponding Mobile App. Using the Haiku Poem App or the Haiku Poem Interactive, students summarize papers they have written using the traditional format of a haiku in this lesson plan.

The Letter Poem Creator provides an online model for the thought process involved in creating poems based upon a letter; then, students are invited to experiment with letter poems independently. In this lesson plan, students explore letter poems and experiment with writing letters as poems, using the placement of line breaks to enhance rhythm, sound, meaning, and appearance.

The Line Break Explorer explores the ways that poets choose line breaks in their writing. After viewing the demonstration, students are invited to experiment with line breaks themselves. They can learn more in “What Makes Poetry? Exploring Line Breaks“.

The Riddle Interactive outlines the characteristics of riddle poems and provides direct instruction on the prewriting and drafting process for writing original riddle poems. “What Am I? Teaching Poetry through Riddles” has students explore figurative language in poetry by reading and writing riddle poems.

Users learn about and write theme poems, a poem written within the shape of the subject of the poem using the Theme Poems tool or Mobile App. “Theme Poems: Writing Extraordinary Poems About Ordinary Objects” invites students to select a familiar object online, build a bank of words related to the object, and write theme poems that are printed and displayed in class.

Word Mover allows children and teens to create “found poetry” by choosing from word banks and existing famous works; additionally, users can add new words to create a piece of poetry by moving/manipulating the text. Additionally, there’s an App version. Use the Word Mover tool to play with word families and listen for rhyme, then sort real and nonsense words, alphabetize the words, and create a story or poem using the words in this activity.

​Do you have other ideas to share? We’d love to know how you use our tools and apps!