Tag Archives: read

Teachers Reading in the Summer

SummerReadingThis week marks the first day of Summer 2016! It’s true that many educators assign reading to their students over the summer. We also know that educators themselves have some books they want to read this summer. The following resources from NCTE provide some suggestions for summer reading for educators.

The author of “Summer Reading: A Reflection” recounts her family’s summer reading which gave her a chance to talk with her children about books and, ultimately, about life.

This Teacher to Teacher column invited teachers to respond to the question, “What Work of Adult Fiction or Nonfiction Do You Recommend to Other Teachers for Summer Reading?

Reading for Fun” includes three teachers’ reflections on their personal reading lives and the reading instruction they provide to students.

For several years the editor of “TYCA to You” compiled annual summer reading lists. The editor states that the reading suggestions “span time and content in ways only voracious readers can.”

A study investigated the relationships between five junior high school teachers’ personal approaches to literature and their teaching of literature in “Teachers Reading/Readers Teaching: Five Teachers’ Personal Approaches to Literature and Their Teaching of Literature“.

When adults and teens read the same book, that shared experience can spark important conversations that might not happen otherwise. Tune in to hear about eight novels that all focus in some way on teens and their complicated relationships with family members, peers, and the larger world.

We here at NCTE pose these questions to you: What is on YOUR reading list this summer? Why? What titles are you recommending to others?

The Four R’s of Summer

4rsCan you believe it? The first day of summer will be here before we know it! Whether your school year is already over or will be soon, here are a few things to get you in the mindset:

Reflect.
Take some time to revel in the journey you’ve taken this school year. This blog post, What I’ll Miss, from Katherine Sokolowski offers a lovely example.

Recharge.
One way to prime your batteries for next school year is to learn new things! Here are a few options we recommend this summer: the Whole Language Umbrella Institute (St. Louis, MO), the online course Using Evidence to Guide Teaching and Learning, and the Conference on English Leadership Regional Institute (Bowling Green, KY).

Relax.
Take care of you. A recent study from the University of Virginia’s Curry School of Education showed that “teachers who regularly use stress-reducing strategies increase their abilities to cope with the demands of the career and are positioned to do a better job educating students.”

Read!
We’re pretty sure you’ve got a summer reading list going already, but if not, you should definitely put #nctechat on June 19th on your calendar. The theme is “Books That Changed My Life” and we’re inviting lots of friends to participate.

If you could invite an author to join this conversation, who would you invite?

Tweet your answer to @ncte and don’t forget to tag the authors!

Also, check out Plan Now for Summer Reading, a blog post on the Literacy in Learning Exchange.

This post is reprinted from the NCTE INBOX Newsletter. Don’t currently get Inbox? Nonmembers can use this form to subscribe to receive a monthly issue of INBOX or can join NCTE to receive INBOX each week as part of their membership.

National Poetry Month: Performing Poetry

Perform a Poem
Perform a Poem

As National Poetry Month winds down, consider inviting students to perform some of the poetry they have read and written throughout the month. Performing poetry allows students to read with expression, using their voice and gestures to convey the meaning of the text. With repeated readings of a poem, younger students become fluent readers and increase their comprehension. Older students analyze and develop their own interpretation of a poem’s meaning and representation through performance.  Take a look at the following resources from NCTE and ReadWriteThink.org.

Performing poetry incorporates oral reading, literature, and the performing arts. This strategy can benefit content area readers, English language learners, or learners with special needs. Read more in this Strategy Guide.

In this lesson, students watch an example of poetry performed orally and then discuss elements of the performance that lead to reading fluency. Students then select a poem to perform in class. A performance critique sheet is used to evaluate performances and can be used for self-evaluation, peer evaluation, and teacher evaluation.

By being present and mindful on nature walks, students write haiku using vivid sensory language; and explore body movement, music and art as visual and kinesthetic representations of their poetry in the lesson plan “Experiencing Haiku Through Mindfulness, Movement & Music“.

Crossing Boundaries Through Bilingual, Spoken-Word Poetry” has students explore the idea of “crossing boundaries” through bilingual, spoken-word poetry, culminating in a poetry slam at school or in the community.

In this lesson plan, using their voices as interpretive instruments, students gain a deeper appreciation of the art of poetry as they prepare a recitation of the frequently anthologized poem “Those Winter Sundays”.

Wordplaygrounds: Reading, Writing, and Performing Poetry in the English Classroom shows how students can move beyond the traditional boundaries of English curricula, interpreting poetry through a variety of media, including music, art, and dance—without special talent and training in these areas.

How do your students perform poetry?

you need to read poetry logo

National Poetry Month: Reading Poetry

“What the poem is about and how it explores that material is more important than the technical means it uses. Yet by focusing on those means, we can perhaps get closer to finding out why we felt what we felt. That process can deepen our reading, enhance it, complicate it.”

This quote from Accent on Meter: A Handbook for Readers of Poetry provides a great rationale for reading poetry. The following resources from ReadWriteThink.org provide opportunities for students to read and appreciate poetry.

Looking for poetry suggestions? Listen to the Grades K – 5 Podcast Episode “Playful Poetry Books to Share“. In this episode, host Emily Manning and guest Sylvia Vardell explore fun ways to read poetry with children. Older students can tune in to “Celebrating Poetry for Teens“. In honor of National Poetry Month in April, host Jennifer Buehler shares her recommendations of a variety of poetry books for teens.

Use the lesson plan “Poetry Portfolios: Using Poetry to Teach Reading” to teach your students about sentence structure, rhyming words, sight words, vocabulary, and print concepts using a weekly poem.

Students read various poems and explore why lines are broken where they are and how they affect rhythm, sound, meaning, and appearance in poetry in “What Makes Poetry? Exploring Line Breaks“.

Explore reading strategies using Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven” and other works. In this lesson plan, students read Poe’s works in both large- and small-group readings then conclude with a variety of projects.

Developing Aesthetic Criteria: Using Music to Move Beyond Like/Dislike with Poetry” assists students in developing the cognitive tool of criteria development for discussing the aesthetics of poetry and music.

Ease students’ fear of interpreting complex poetry by teaching them a strategy with which they determine patterns of imagery, diction, and figurative language in order to unlock meaning with the lesson plan “Thinking Inductively: A Close Reading of Seamus Heaney’s ‘Blackberry Picking’“.

How do you engage students in reading poetry?